Administrator holds another lackluster auction

Building at 204 E. 7th St., where a studio apartment at auction received the most active bidding, selling finally for $194,000.

Only four of 10 properties offered at auction by Public Administrator Ethel J. Griffin in Manhattan found buyers today.

Worse, the city collected just 26 percent of the minimum for all the properties.  The minimums totaled $2.921 million, but the amount sold reached only $746,000.

In the Surrogate’s Courthouse oppostie the Municipal Building in lower Manhattan, the event attracted an unusually large crowd of some 60 individuals, some of them merely accompanying the bidders.

The first property offered, a 304-sf co-op in poor condition at 204 E. 7th St., had 15-20 bidders jammed in front of a long conference table at which city officials and lawyers were seated as the sale of Unit 12 began.  Continue reading

City to auction off 8 co-ops, 1 condo, 1 house

View from the Castle Village complex of five buildings from 120 to 200 Cabrini Boulevard in Washington Heights. A one-bedroom unit at 180 Cabrini Boulevard is in the city's estate auction next month.

Two co-ops that bidders previously shunned and six newly available ones, plus a West Harlem condo, are scheduled to be auctioned from the estates of owners who left no wills by Public Administrator Ethel J. Griffin in Manhattan on Dec. 8 at 11:30 a.m.

In a rare occurrence, a property outside of Manhattan also is to go on the block.  It is a single-family house in the East Hampton area with a minimum bid of $725,000.  The house has one and a half stories over a basement and a two-car garage with annual taxes of $5,800.  It can be inspected Nov. 20, Nov. 27 and Dec. 4 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Minimum bids for the apartments, which span Washington Heights and Chinatown, range from a low of Continue reading

Halloween’s gone, but how about those ghosts?

The usual Halloween profusion of accounts of ghosts in the news media got me thinking.

I’ll bet if you ask whether they believe in ghosts, 99 out of 100 people would profess denial.  I know I would, even in the face of pieces like the one in the Southampton Press, which made me wonder how many of us disbelievers would wittingly purchase a haunted house.

Although the haunted Hamptons may be often discussed, the conversation lacks specifics or is whispered among trusted friends, so the article relates.  Conceded Richard Barons, executive director of the East Hampton Historical Society:

“It’s here, it’s just that nobody wants to admit it.”  Continue reading