Queens auction garners $4,796,000 for city coffers

This house in Woodside received the highest bid, $601,000, at an estate auction by the Queens County public administrator.

Although five of 21 apartments and houses at an estate auction held yesterday by Queens Public Administrator Lois M. Rosenblatt were withdrawn, every property on the block found a buyer.  Bids totaled $4.796,000.

With upset prices given first, here are the results: Continue reading

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8 co-ops, 13 houses in Queens head to city auction

251-38 43rd Ave., Little Neck

The auction of 21 Queens co-ops and single-family homes is scheduled for Dec. 15.

Public Administrator Lois M. Rosenblatt has set upset prices ranging from $41,000 for a co-op in Jamaica to $453,000 for the single-family house in Little Neck shown at the top.  All the properties belong to the estates of owners who left no will.

Sorry for the slightly weird formatting (because of my limited knowledge of HTML), but below are the available residences headed for the auction block: Continue reading

Ready, set, go with your paddles to these two auctions

 

Ordered by the lender, the auction of this house in the Bronx has an opening bid of $200,000.

 

Two upcoming auctions will give bidders separate opportunities to buy properties in three boroughs and, from New York City, everything but the kitchen sink that belonged to residents who left no will.

Along with commercial properties in the Bronx, a house in Woodmere, a house in Londonderry, Vt., and a subdivision in Wappingers Falls, Maltz Auctions is is offering bidders the chance to purchase: Continue reading

Going once and then going one more time

If you have your heart set on buying an apartment or single-family home in Riverdale or Queens, you may well get a great deal in two separate auctions announced over the weekend.

First, Riverdale in the Bronx.  The Solaria, a 20-story condominium on W. 237th Street, towers over the surrounding low-rise neighborhood with a glass-walled facade that echoes the sleek buildings now seen all over Manhattan, the New York Times observes.

It has a rooftop observatory with a telescope, a children’s playroom, an entertainment center and lounge, balconies, on-site parking, large layouts — in short, everything except buyers.  As of last week, only 10 buyers had actually closed on apartments, the last in September 2008.

Now the developer is offering the remaining 54 units at auction on Nov. 22 in what Jim Corum, the president of REDC, the California auction company that is handling the sale, called an “accelerated marketing plan.” He said it presumably with a straight face. Continue reading